Fedora Alpha , Beta and general release software release

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
3 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Fedora Alpha , Beta and general release software release

Timothy Ward
Do you have to upgrade Alpha to Beta and then to general release
version software as it becomes available or is it upgraded to the
latest available version as Beta or general release becomes available.
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Fedora Alpha , Beta and general release software release

Ed Greshko
On 06/10/17 07:55, Timothy Ward wrote:
> Do you have to upgrade Alpha to Beta and then to general release
> version software as it becomes available or is it upgraded to the
> latest available version as Beta or general release becomes available.


No, you don't have to do that.  As a matter of fact, unless you are
"testing" and are willing to suffer data loss or an unstable and
potentially broken system you should probably avoid Alpha and Beta releases.

In most instances it is safer for the average user to update their
systems to the next version after the next version is formally released.

--
Fedora Users List - The place to go to speculate endlessly
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Fedora Alpha , Beta and general release software release

Peter Gueckel
Ed Greshko wrote:

> On 06/10/17 07:55, Timothy Ward wrote:
>> Do you have to upgrade Alpha to Beta and then to general
release
>> version software as it becomes available or is it upgraded
to the
>> latest available version as Beta or general release becomes
available.
>
>
> No, you don't have to do that.  As a matter of fact, unless
you are
> "testing" and are willing to suffer data loss or an unstable
and
> potentially broken system you should probably avoid Alpha
and Beta
> releases.
>
> In most instances it is safer for the average user to update
their
> systems to the next version after the next version is
formally released.

Fedora 26 was very solid and usable right from the release of
the Alpha. Unfortunately, the previous 2-3 releases did not
become usable until the Beta or even the Release Candidates,
but I have found this to be very atypical of Fedora. I am glad
that the quality control is back to where it has been in the
past. In fact, I read that for Fedora 27, there will no longer
be an Alpha, as Quality will be maintained throughout.
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]